Replies to Vivian ChukwuemekaThe phases of change theory by Ronald Havelock is all about preparation. This theory suggests that before instigating change, one has to go through six stages of preparation (Udod, 2020). The first and second phases assess the need for change. These first two phases prompt a change-agent to contemplate the value of the change and help one to determine whether the change is worth the effort. The third and fourth phase of this planned theory requires the instigator of change to source for the resources needed to make the change a reality. The fifth phase is all about familiarizing the recipients of the change on what is about to happen. The latter involves educating the staff and actively communicating with them about the changes long before they are implemented. The final phase entails the close monitoring of the change after its implementation by the change-agent to ensure that the change is successful. If the change is successfully implemented, the change agent ought to separate himself or herself from it.Kurt Lewin’s three-stage change theory is all about efficiency and aims to reduce the disruption of workflow that comes when new changes are introduced in an organization. This unfreezing, movement and refreezing theory prepares staff members for change, implements the change and ensures that the organization has adapted well to the changes made (Gupta, 2020). Since it only requires three stages, this change theory is not only relatively easy to implement; it also takes a short time.My choice change theory when it comes to the implementation of the evidence-based practices in the hospital is Kurt Lewin’s theory. Lewin’s theory, unlike Havelock’s, takes a short time to implement and is, therefore, a more pragmatic approach in a hospital setting. My preceptor has used the Lewin’s theory before. He recommends it because it minimally disrupts the workflow in a hospital.

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